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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
into industrial policy, but certainly to provide an environment which business can operate profitably with certainty, with predictability and with the flexibility it needs and then try to attract the industries of the future. that is, you know, it may sound like a pat set of prescriptions, but it's the best idea we have. i don't know, as i said, if we have the national will to implement it. and even if we did, it's a long, long, slow process. but i don't see the alternative. i don't think closing our borders is an alternative, i don't think mandating wages that are uncompetitive is a solution. i don't have a better idea. >> heidi, a better idea or do you want to endorse steve's -- >> where you started which was with the foreign direct investment and what we should be looking to do is try to attract further foreign direct investment. foreign-owned companies already provide about five million jobs in the u.s., and they tend to, your story aside, tend to be fairly high-paying jobs, relatively high-paying jobs. today tend to be more weighted towards the manufacturing sector, and so to the
, and they wanted to do business with you, partner with you, create an environment that makes it possible to invest. we know we need this. the plan, itself, is governed by a certain set of economic lodgic and rationality. here are two different interesting realities. the economic imperatives seem to be understood by the imperative, and they have a public to respond to. it's not just the egypt of mubarak where you discount the public. it seems to affect their thinking. that has implications for what the administration will do. it means that if we stand by certain principles, which, in my mind, reflect practicalities, that we have an ability to affect their behavior. what's it mean in terms of principles? well, first and foremost, republic minority rights. that's at principle for us and practicality for them. if you see large numbers of the coptic christians leaving egypt, that's not exactly a source of encouragement for people on the outside to invest. if they exclude half the population, 56% of egyptian women who are illiterate, you look at the draft constitution, and there's language in there abou
-intentioned authoritarian leaders because they raileesed to survive in that environment you have to succumb to that environment. you have to assimilate into that environment. so, the system in syria is very inert in that sense and was much more difficult to overcome, obviously, and perhaps he didn't have the -- where with annual and ability to take on the real forces in syria who are status quo forces and against any change that might undermine the foundation of their rule and situation. >> the situp in syria by the colonial powers was france was working with a shiite sect, which is a minority, who were to look after the sunnies, who are the majority. 10% or shias of another sect. assad belongs to this sect ands the military is from this sect and the elite are from this sect. correct? >> partial limit he would not be able to rule if it was only them in the inner circle. >> they basically in control. >> they're dominant in the military apparatus but they have also done a very good job, started under his father. of coe opting many sunnies, christians in particular and others, into the apparat
air strikes. and it has been a problem since this administration helped create the environment in north africa. and in the middle east, with those who want to see israel destroyed could take power. more violence has occurred. not less. more people's lives are in danger, not less. there's less freedom of worship, not more. the things that we believe in, freedom of worship of all people, or no worship if people choose not to worship, those kind of things should be kept. and yet, we are seeing this administration took over afghanistan, more americans die and about half the time under commander-in-chief obama has died in seven years than president bush. american military. over 70% of those killed in afghanistan have been under commander obama and about half the time. we have seen violence escalating against americans in afghanistan. we have seen the last christian church, public christian church pull out of afghanistan. this administration should be encouraging freedom of worship, encouraging the liberation of women, of children. and yet, for all its help, it has created environmen
to return profits in 2013, but high fuel costs and a poor economic environment continued to weigh on profits. air berlin is not alone in going through some turbulence. this is not a great time for europe's airlines. >> many are struggling to stay in business. here's a look at the litany of problems they face. >> scandinavian airline sas is fighting for survival. the carrier has not turned a profit in five years. it is not alone. just last week, spain's flagship carrier said it would cut nearly a quarter of its work force in an effort to remain competitive. sas alone plans to cut more than 1/3 of its 15,000 employees. air france is looking to reduce staff to 45,000 workers. and germany's lufthansa is also in the midst of a painful cost- cutting program. earlier this week, the airline struck a deal with unions to raise cabin crew pay in exchange for no strikes over the christmas holidays. >> coming up, we've got some sports news for you. >> first, some other stories making news around the world. three demonstrators have vented their anger at a german consul. he was heading for a meeting with l
is the contributing environment that is lending itself. a lot of the police officers have to be at a certain rank and have to be kept on the contract as a source of the sort of securing full time to permanent status with protection. this is one of the conditions that actually makes it much easier on superiors and senior members of the security establishment to basically pressure them into taking questionable activities. if you don't pull the trigger then i will endure contract by the end of this year because you are in a contract you are basically not protected. i would -- you know, i would question the assumption that the securities sector reform is necessarily aimed at, you know, disempowering are dismantling the securities sector, and i would actually say that there are a lot of measures, a lot of proposals in the case of egypt that would strengthen the status of the living conditions and the working conditions of the egyptian police. >> we think that this idea of the reform versus strengthening. when we talk about strengthening, are we talking about more weapons, more capabilities that they c
. devastating the environment there. tourism costing many people their jobs, as well. cnn's ed lavandera saw the devastation firsthand when he covered the story. ed, as, of course, we wait eric holder's arrival, i'll let you proceed and may have to interrupt you as soon as he is to enter the room. so, what kind of reaction is there from this $4 billion planned settlement? >> reporter: well, i think a lot of people in the gulf coast region trying to figure out what all of this means and the money will be parcelled out. >> all right. sorry about that, ed. you have to hold that thought there. here's u.s. attorney general eric holder. >> i'm honored to join with associate attorney general tony west, assistant attorney general for the criminal division of the justice department lanny brewer, director robert casami of the security and exchange division, john beretta, head of the de deepwater horizon and achieving justice for those whose lives and livelihoods were impacted by the largest environmental disaster in the history of the united states. and to hold accountable -- hold accountable those wh
process and with this going on, we will have very difficult environment for investment and growth for the euro area to go ahead. so without clarity where the euro area goes, the environment will be quite difficult. p. >> okay. thanks very much for that. now, he mentioned weakness in europe. that's extending to the u.s. we are seeing futures trying to rebond here, but again, we saw levels of decline in the range of 1.3 to 1.5 yesterday for the major bourses. this morning we're really only getting about 25 points in rebound for the dow jones industrial average. which is thousand sitting at 12,559. the nasdaq and s&p are also showing a little about the of a r rebit of a rebound, but not huge moves. investors digest the growth tigs or lack thereof. spain is trying to move to the up side adding almost 0.3%, so a little better than last time we checked in. the other three down. as we're learning about the slowing of the german economy and the ftse 100, shedding 0.4%, below the 5700 mark. now, we are seeing in the uk a little better, but broadly speaking a mixed picture. we started off s
effective agricultural environment around fez within, say, 15 or 20 miles radius. but you also had very effective forms of nonhuman transport -- donkeys, camels, horses, mules -- that could bring in all of the kinds of supplies that the city needed. now, that's one reason why you had such high population densities. one of the effects of really high population densities, of course, is to create very dense urban markets, lots of consumers concentrated in small spaces. and this is one of the reasons why fez has such a high degree of urban specialization. keach: as in ancient ostia, almost everyone in fez is a full-time specialist. in the tanning industry alone, there are some 20 specialized activities required to process skins into leather. there are washers and hair removers, buyers and sellers, and transport specialists. there are even specialties within a specialty. there are people who handle the donkeys that bring skins into the market, while others handle the donkeys taking skins out. this is a hair removing factory. it is run by mr. abdelrrahman ovadghiri. interpreter: we get up ear
create in that environment is kidding themselves. >> in the far back -- >> i want to follow up on what you were saying -- it seems the 14-point plan could form the basis for some kind of u.s. presentation of a possible step leading to a deal between you and ambassador jeffries, the middle east peace process, obviously, while important, does not seem to be the first priority when you look at what is going on in the middle east. i'm wondering if that is because there is fatigue or there is so much more pressing interest between iran, syria, and the growing islamic threat or is it because the parties are not ready for a deal. present obama pledged to make this a priority. -- president obama pledged to make this a priority. >> obviously, an effort was made and it did not materialize but then it got swamped by a lot of other things. one of the most frustrating things for palestinians is that no one is paying attention to them. look at the region itself. the gulf states are focused on iran, syria primarily, the merchants -- the emergence of the muslim brotherhood in egypt. they are focused d
to know what their taxes are going to be. they need to know what the regulatory environment is going to be. they need to hhve an element of confidence before they're going to go out and start hiring again. right now, the large firms sector is under down, the small firm ector is down 15 at 20 feet tall waiting for some safety to come out again. so it is really incumbent upon washington to find the regulatory tax and fiscal landscape in a positive way. lou: of want to go through some of your outlook. you are saying that if we go over the cliff, tax hikes and spending cuts will translate into sequestration and the lapse of the bush tax cuts. the tax hikes would translate into a reduction in economic growth of 4%. that's automatic recession. >> absolutely. so the fiscal cliff is a contraction in the government impulse and the economy of 4-5% of gdp. i would say in the first order that will hit and reduce economic growth from 2 percent down to-1,-2 very easily. lou: and your outlook on employment, unemployment dropping -- dropping, in my dreams, rising from just under 8% to 9 and a half percen
is sponsored by the national security committee. my name is john harrington environment private practice in new york city and in connecticut and i am the cochair of the national security committee. i would like to recognize our cosponsor an committee, the aerospace and defense industry committee and william black, my cochair for this presentation. it stretches back a full year when the national security committee proposed a program, which we tried to divine which program would have currency. we were fortunate to have leon panetta last week make a very widely broadcasted speech on the subject of cybersecurity and cyberwarfare. accordingly, the subject matter has been in news. he outlined his deep concerns about computer networks that support our military, infrastructure and business networks. mr. leon panetta elaborated on many things and that includes the high-profile attacks, including the alleged russian denial of service attack entering into georgia, the disruptions in estonia and the iranian nuclear centrifuges. there are dozens of thwarted attacks on other infrastructure occurring on an al
sovereign nation. and the money doesn't go to clean it up. i know mr. waxman loves the environment, so do i. but this money doesn't go for that purpose. it can be used for anything. it's not for engine technology, it's not for restoration of the environment. and it doesn't stop emissions. so this bill does represent a bipartisan, bicameral compromise. but it gives us the authority to hold their feet to the fire and get a solution. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from west virginia. mr. lahood: mr. speaker, the gentleman i am going to yield to now may be departing the congress after this session. but we will still value his professionalism, his expertise and certainly his friendship for the very near and distant future. i'm happy to yield five minutes to the gentleman from illinois, the once chairman and now ranking member of our aviation subcommittee on transportation. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. >> i thank the gentleman, the running backing member, for yieldin
to your population is, you have to manage expectations of these kinds of environments because the frustration of your population outweighs the progress, then it's difficult to be able to show that there is something that has actually been done to say that this is what we have accomplished a bad thing that is the kind of thing. >> time may not be on the side. very quickly. >> well, he talked about the problem with sequencing. we mentioned in our report. the curate catch-22 and securities sector reform is you need democracy, and you need security sector reform for democracy. how to manage this paradox to let this catch-22 is a central question. in that regard you cannot achieve everything quickly, and if you go after the most entrenched forces you will be tremendous resistance. we saw that in tunisia. at one of the things i . out that think is very much true for both countries and to some extent for libya, even though we have the absence of the state, is to push the democracy process forward. in institutional and constitutional process because you cannot move and the deeper issu
in mind the absence of of this level of manpower and as a worker contributing to the environment of lending itself to the idea that we have been seeing in egypt lately previous practices by the egyptian police, for example the fact that a lot of the police officers have to be on a certain rank and have to be kept on contract securing full time permanent employment status with protection. this is one of the conditions that actually makes it much easier on the superiors and senior members of the security establishment to basically pressure them into taking on questionable activities. if you don't pull the trigger then i went toward contract by the end of this year because you are all on a contract and you are basically not protected. so i would just question the assumption that the securities sector reform is necessarily aimed at, you know, at disempowering the security to say that there are a lot of measures and reforms in the case of egypt the with strength in the status of the conditions and the working conditions and the egyptians. >> i think that when we talk about the securit
technologies allow natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. >>> erin burnett is going out front tonight with someone who knows jill kelley personally. >> yes, and has known her for a long time. he is the publisher of "tampa bay magazine." he knows her well and i think his view of her is different than what some have heard, but we'll ask what kind of woman she really is, why she was so close to all of these military officers. and we'll be talking about the fbi investigation and if the president really answered the question today when he put the blame on the fbi, and he said he was frustrated that he was not told for six months. and the war of words, wolf, which was so interesting to watc
-democratic wave year. it was probably impossible in 2010. but in a relatively level playing field environment, it was still something. the fact that democrats were still in the hunt in north dakota -- i have not looked to see what the president's number was there. it was pretty impressive. john tester, the other one that is still up in the air, fairly moderate. it looks like he may survive. tim kaine won in virginia. the republicans, their brand is hurting them -- their candidates -- in certain kinds of places, even the kind of candidates that should have chances to win in traditionally republican states. think about how far to the right mitt romney had to go to nail down that nomination. people say, what impact did the superpacs have? had adelson not kick in the money for newt gingrich, he would have been out of the race a long time ago. if not for foster freeze, rick santorum would have been out of there. romney had to move to the right to nail down the nomination. it made it more difficult, more awkward for him to go back toward the center to win a general election. if you are going to say
environment. that's the education secretary, arne duncan, who is very tall, by the way, a former pro basketball player in australia. [laughter] he was there and spoke. this is a group that gets no federal money, alto secretary duncan does make space available in his education department building for tutoring of these kids who really need the help. it's a great organization, and i was happy to help them last night. so, jenna, i hope you missed me. jenna: i did, always. maybe a pick-up game with secretary duncan in the future? maybe? jon: maybe, although i am probably the worst basketball player on the planet. jenna: i'm ready to go, jon.
sorts of things. but also along with training them, you have to create an institution and environment were you see guys going to happen and it's not necessarily a career ender when it happened. but we are working on it and i think we've gotten better because it's absolutely essential that we do. briefly in the demographics, one of the things i noticed was about 70% are public diplomacy dollars were spent if you do it demographically on an over the age we flipped out because looking at the world and the way it is, the fact of the matter is you have a far better opportunity employment being a planting seeds of the younger demographic, paul said it is difficult when someone reaches 40, 50, 62 change their perception of their ideas. when they are younger you have an ability to do it. if we can have a good conversation with a young girl in pakistan, 15 or 16 years old, she will be able to change the perception of the united states and her family and her community and away we never could. so it's a wise estimate, not just for the future, but frankly for right now. >> so with a clash of tech
examines how the u.s. can be economically competitive in a global environment. >> later today british prime minister david cameron delivers his keynote address on policy at the lord mayor's banquet in london. the event is attended by members of the city's financial and diplomatic corps. you can see his remarks live at 3:30 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> 2013 should be the year we begin to solve our debt through tax reform and entitlement reform. and i'm proposing that we avert the fiscal cliff together in a manner that insures that 2013 is finally the year that our government comes to grips with the major problems that are facing us. >> i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenges. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me, making over $250,000, aren't asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> the newly-elected congress starts work in january, but the current congress still has work to do through the end of the
. and talking about the public. that is not an environment in which she wheeled to say, let's go put a plan of a table. he put a plan to the table in both size and rejected. i will pause now. i actually do. >> we are already way over time. that would give one last quick question. >> thank you very much. i am with the law's vagueness council. my question is, if the demonstration decides that military action is only the -- the only exercisable options, have the other allies signaled or committed that there would support israel and the u.s.? if so, who and what type of support can we expect? >> well, i don't think there have been those kinds of discussions because the focus is ben on diplomacy on everybody's part. by the way, it's an israeli concept. the israelis believe you can still achieve this through non-military means. one of the reasons i oftentimes did ask the question, wireless so vocal about this? if you look at what they did, the syrian one. you never heard word one about that. there's three reasons. it was designed to motivate the rest of the world. i think, by the way, we know fro
's not an environment in which you can say, gee, put a plan on the table and have it be sented. put a plan on the table, both sides reject it. if you put a plan on the table, the idea it's only table, it might be something that could work in a certain moment, but if they are rejected, it's hard then to somehow recreate it so i will pause now. i actually do have a 14-point proposal which will shock you. [laughter] i actually do. >> we are already -- >> i'm willing to leave it. >> you were patient. wuch last quick question and quick answer. >> thank you very much. i'm with the las vegas council. if the administration decides that military action is our only exercisable option, have other allies signaled or committed they would support israel and the u.s.? if so, who, and what type of support can we expect? >> well, i don't think there's been those kinds of discussions because the focus has been on diplomacy on everybody's part. the concept of crippling sanctions is an israeli concept telling you the first instance the israelis believe you can achieve this in notary public--- non-military means. i'm asked
environmentings. but i don't believe, my gut tells me there wasn't necessarily a breach of classified information in terms of broadwell's access to petraeus. jenna: mike, would you stay with us, we've got to take a quick commercial break, about now the person who is running the cia and our national security now at this point in our nation. o we'll be right back with mike and more "happening now". [ male announcer ] only polaris delivers the ultimate combination of power, suspension and agility. the only trail capable side-by sides, featuring the ultimate value, r 570. the only 4-passenge sport machines, led by the all-new rzr xp 4 and the undisputed king of high performance, rzr xp. razor sharp performance. only from polaris. get huge rebates on 2012's and low financing on all models during the polaris holiday sales event. jenna: mike baker back with us, former cia operative. mike, we wake up this week anew, right? we had one of the most decorated, well respected military officers at the head of our cia at this time last week, and now we don't. who's the temporary guy that's taking control of the
operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. social security are just numbers thinkin a budget.d... well, we worked hard for those benefits. we earned them. and if washington tries to cram decisions about the future... of these programs into a last minute budget deal... we'll all pay the price. aarp is fighting to protect seniors with responsible... solutions that strengthen medicare and... social security for generations to come. we can do better than a last minute deal... that would hurt all of us. well that was uncalled for. folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico sure are happy. how happy, ronny? happier than gallagher at a farmers' market. get happy. get geico. chances are, you're not made of money, so don't overpay for motorcycle insurance. geico, see how much you could save. so i brought it to mike at meineke. we gave her car a free road handling check. i like free. free is good. my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> 32 people are dead, 438 sick from a deadly meningitis outbreak here in the u.s. and today a demand f
into these environments which are very, very important places to be, and debate our core value, not just explained them, not just lecture, but actually debate our greatest strengths i think will be stronger. so that was one of the ways we really tried to do that. and also to take the benefit of the folks who were there in the field, give information as to who was the important audiences for the bbg. >> can i just clarify one thing? when i said more guidance from foreign policy leadership for the bbg, i certainly didn't mean that the bbg should forsake or distort or anyway jeopardize the journalistic values. very, very important. but for example, the bbg's, the board of governors decide where the assets are allocated. in other words, if the governors decide we're going to put all the money into india, it's their decision rather than the part of the more strategic decision-making process. congress would get involved if all the money went to one country. >> do you think? [laughter] >> there's certain country's bbg would like to get rid of that congress wouldn't allow and that sort of thing. but i'm guessi
folks at the highest classified levels, they do that in a classified environment, get to the bottom of what did we know, when did we know it, how did it come to us and what did those feeds look like and how did we fuse that picture and disseminate that picture? once we get a better sense of that, you can say with greater confidence we need to combine armed services, we need the combined intelligence and foreign affairs. >> david petraeus is going to testify tomorrow, he was head of the cia. he was in benghazi. he talked to the surviving players i should say. will he have every single answer that lawmakers need? >> oh, no, carol, not at all. you know the answer to that question. he'll have through his own filter and through the filter -- every piece of data that is input goes through a filter on multiple levels to include your personal level. so he's not going to have every answer. he's going to be able to provide what he was able to assess. and in spite of what he's dealing with on a personal level, he can compartmentize very, very well. we've now figured that out. he'll be able to
-- >> environment, economy, on and on and on. >> environmental region. >> thanks, christy. >> you're welcome. >>> wait until you hear what mitt romney is saying now, that is coulding up. presenting androgel 1.62%. both are used to treat men with low testosterone. androgel 1.62% is from the makers of the number one prescribed testosterone replacement therapy. it raises your testosterone levels, and... is concentrated, so you could use less gel. and with androgel 1.62%, you can save on your monthly prescription. [ male announcer ] dosing and application sites between these products differ. women and children should avoid contact with application sites. discontinue androgel and call your doctor if you see unexpected signs of early puberty in a child, or, signs in a woman which may include changes in body hair or a large increase in acne, possibly due to accidental exposure. men with breast cancer or who have or might have prostate cancer, and women who are, or may become pregnant or are breast feeding should not use androgel. serious side effects include worsening of an enlarged prostate, possi
's different about this environment is fax the tax rates, the bush tax rates to expire for everybody. after this campaign would be pretty shocking as any candidate ever. i am going to raise taxes, and unless he suddenly decides i didn't mean it it doesn't really matter all that much what the speaker thinks is acceptable because on this one issue that tax cuts will expire. all house republicans a sign grover norquist not to raise tax rates. the entire bush tax cut expires the end of the year you extend it for 97% of americans he's never actually voted to raise taxes. you're only cutting taxes. so it's possible when the speaker said that yesterday i was thinking it wasn't really reflecting the world that he now lives and so unless the president is willing, they will not be. >> i have a question for you. to what extent will there be a major -- it was in the republican party against the tea party. >> i'm sorry? >> to what extent will there be an overt republican movement against the tea party? >> i don't know that there would be a strong overt movement against them in large part the sort of fea
. >> so jim has just put a serious policy issue on the table. this is a partisan, you know, environment that we're in. we're inside the u.s. capitol here, or steps from the capitol inside a committee room. there's not much that happens in the washington today because of the partisan fighting. um, is there room after this agenda where we just spent $6 billion in a campaign beating each other's brains out and came up with the same president, the same congress and the same senate for serious, bipartisan efforts on curing diseases like alzheimer's or any other short of agenda? ralph or stan, we start with somebody from a partisan perspective. >> well, let me put the this on my wish list. i'm sure this seems like it's going to be a partisan comment. the -- i looked at ralph's reaction to this, um, where he said that if we look at what the pattern of who votes in the 2010 election, if that is replicated in 2014, um, then we will, then we can have a big pushback against the democrats, okay? the -- now, that's a formula, because that's what happened in 2010. 2010 set up 2012. that is, the extre
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)